1/43rd (Monmouthshire) Light Infantry

To celebrate Labor Day, here are the fruits of some of my labor: my first completed battalion for Sam Mustafa’s Lasalle! Ladies (yeah, right) and Gentlemen, I give you the 1/43rd Monmouthshire.

Skirmishers out!

Skirmishers out! That’s the 1/52nd, with their fancy-pants mounted colonel, approaching in column, and a bit of Ross’s Battery is off to the 43rd’s left.

In Lasalle terms, this unit is a “normal” four stand regiment, with a skirmish value of 3. The skirmish value means that the unit is capable of fighting as irregulars (useful in BUAs and woods), and can be completely broken down into skirmish bases to be distributed among the players forces as supplementary skirmish points. Each base has 6 figures, for a total of 24 redcoats in the unit. As you can see, the 43rd had white facings. A practical note for you Lasalle players…18mm AB figures barely fit on a 40mm base, especially when they’re marching with their muskets in trail. Stick with figures with shoulder-arms (is that right?) poses.

Line formation

Line formation

I’m basing my force, which will eventually be a division with attached elements, on the Light Division under Bob Craufurd at Bussaco. At this battle, the 43rd was brigaded with the 3rd Cacadores, as well as four companies of the 1/95th Rifles. They were lead by Lt. Col. Sidney Beckwith. Interestingly, depending on how I approach the attached brigade that is part of the standard Lasalle force, I could end up with a British ‘army’ with only two battalions of redcoats.

Form square, lads!

Form square, lads!

I’m going to concentrate on finishing up this brigade, which means I’ll be painting Cacadores, or rifles, next. Probably Cacadores, as I already have the figures!
—————–
The Scarlet J has decided to join me in this project (huzzah!), and will be building a French force. We’ll start giving the rules a workout, once we have three or four battalions and some artillery to put on the table.

Advertisements
Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Comments

  • cama4actual  On 09/08/2015 at 12:53 am

    Lovely work! AB again?

    • arkiegamer  On 09/08/2015 at 7:02 am

      Thank you, and yes! I figure the cost of the miniature is miniscule compared to the time and effort involved in painting them up, so why not use the best?

      • cama4actual  On 09/09/2015 at 12:32 pm

        Indeed! I like the cut of your job.

      • cama4actual  On 09/09/2015 at 12:33 pm

        Damnable ducking autocorrect. I like the cut of your JIB. There it is.

      • arkiegamer  On 09/09/2015 at 1:28 pm

        I haven’t started the Napoleonic naval project. Yet.

  • Paul Wisken  On 09/08/2015 at 1:48 am

    Nice. I look forward to meeting the rest of the brigade.

    • arkiegamer  On 09/08/2015 at 7:03 am

      Thank you, sir. I expect cacadores to go much quicker than redcoats.

      • cama4actual  On 09/09/2015 at 12:33 pm

        Spray brown. Done.

  • tinpotrevolutionary  On 09/08/2015 at 4:10 am

    They’re the scum of the earth but you’ve made them into jolly good fellows! ;)

  • daggerandbrush  On 09/09/2015 at 8:40 pm

    Very excellent indeed. 15mm I presume? The AB stuff is really top notch. Even the proportions look more realistic than many 28mm offerings. Effective colour scheme that pronounces the details and very evocative basing. I could see that a heavier use of flesh wash would pronounce the faces a bit more and give the unit more character.

    • arkiegamer  On 09/09/2015 at 8:47 pm

      Yes, they’re 15mm (18mm) AB figures. I’ve been noticing in the photographs that I’m wiping out the dark tones in the recesses of the faces-I wish I could see it on the painting table! Also, the piping, belts, and crossbelts are very sloppy. It may be time to invest in some sort of magnifying glass.

You know what to do

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: